EICAR 2011 Paper

And a big hand, please, for my EICAR 2011 paper!

This is a paper I presented last week at the EICAR conference in Krems, Austria, on “Security Software & Rogue Economics: New Technology or New Marketing?” Here’s the abstract:

A highlight of the 2009 Virus Bulletin Conference was a panel session on “Free AV vs paid-for AV; Rogue AVs”, chaired by Paul Ducklin. As the title indicates, the discussion was clearly divided into two loosely related topics, but it was perhaps the first indication of a dawning awareness that the security industry has a problem that is only now being acknowledged.

Why is it so hard for the general public to distinguish between the legitimate AV marketing model and the rogue marketing approach used by rogue (fake) security software? Is it because the purveyors of rogue services are so fiendishly clever? Is it simply because the public is dumb? Is it, as many journalists would claim, the difficulty of discriminating between “legitimate” and criminal flavours of FUD (Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt)? Is the AV marketing model fundamentally flawed? In any case, the security industry needs to do a better job of explaining its business models in a way that clarifies the differences between real and fake anti-malware, and the way in which marketing models follow product architecture.

This doesn’t just mean declining to mimic rogue AV marketing techniques, bad though they are for the industry and for the consumer: it’s an educational initiative, and it involves educating the business user, the end-user, and the people who market and sell products. A security solution is far more than a scanner: it’s a whole process that ranges from technical research and development, through marketing and sales, to post-sales support. But so is a security threat, and rogue applications involve a wide range of skills: not just the technical range associated with a Stuxnet-like, multi-disciplinary tiger team, but the broad skills ranging from development to search engine optimization, to the psychologies of evaluation and ergonomics, to identity and brand theft, to call centre operations that are hard to tell apart from legitimate support schemes, for the technically unsophisticated customer. A complex problem requires a complex and comprehensive solution, incorporating techniques and technologies that take into account the vulnerabilities inherent in the behaviour of criminals, end-users and even prospective customers, rather than focusing entirely on technologies for the detection of malicious binaries.

This paper contrasts existing malicious and legitimate technology and marketing, but also looks at ways in which holistic integration of multi-layered security packages might truly reduce the impact of the current wave of fake applications and services.

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
ESET Senior Research Fellow

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Phish Phodder: Is User Education Helping or Hindering?

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David Harley & Andrew Lee, “Phish Phodder: Is User Education Helping or Hindering?” (davidharleyandrewleevb2007), September 2007, Virus Bulletin. Copyright is held by Virus Bulletin Ltd, but the document is made available on this site for personal use free of charge by permission of Virus Bulletin.

ABSTRACT
Mostly, security professionals can spot a phish a mile off. If they do err, it’s usually on the side of caution, for instance when real organizations fail to observe best practice and generate phish-like marketing messages. Many sites are now addressing the problem with phishing quizzes, intended to teach the everyday user to distinguish phish from phowl (sorry). Academic papers on why people fall for phishing mails and sites are something of a growth industry. Yet phishing attacks continue to increase, and while accurate and up-to-date figures for financial loss are hard to come by, indications are that losses from phishing and other forms of identity theft continue to climb.

This paper:
1. Evaluates current research on how end users are susceptible to phishing attacks and ID theft.
2. Evaluates a range of web-based educational and informational resources in general and summarizes the pros and cons of the quiz approach in particular.
3. Reviews the shared responsibility of phished institutions and phishing mail targets for reducing the impact of phishing scams. What constitutes best practice for finance-related mail-outs and e-commerce transactions? How far can we rely on detection technology?

Teach Your Children Well

 

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teach-your-children-well is a paper by myself, Eddy Willems and Judith Harley presented by Eddy and myself at the Virus Bulletin Conference in 2005, and published in the conference proceedings.

David Harley, Eddy Willems & Judith Harley, “Teach Your Children Well – ICT Security And The Younger Generation”, October 2005, Virus Bulletin. Copyright is held by Virus Bulletin Ltd, but the document is made available on this site for personal use free of charge by permission of Virus Bulletin.

ABSTRACT

An article by Eddy Willems in the August 2004 edition of VB discussed his research into the security awareness of Belgian children. The authors have developed this theme by submitting a similar questionnaire to ICT pupils in the UK and using the results as a basis for an interactive presentation and discussion with several groups in the UK, and an assignment-based follow-up with different groups was undertaken early in March 2005.

The paper is not intended as a completed formal study, but considers this presentation and the issues that came up in this preliminary research as a basis for further study and teaching tools. It also considers a range of resources in the area of child safety, learning, attitudes and behaviour as they affect and are affected by the use of information and communications technology, and the influence of the media, government, and the Internet itself. While the preliminary research has largely focused on malware and email abuse, we will also consider how these areas are connected with other technologies and areas of concern among parents and educators.